Michael Jackson Tickets go on sale on Friday

It was announced last week that Michael Jackson would perform again in the UK, for what he claims is the last time ever. Tickets for the shows go on sale on Friday, and Michael will be performing 10 shows at London’s O2 Arena, which only holds around 20,000 people.

That’s just 200,000 people able to see him, and apparently 300,000 people have already registered their interest in seeing his tour.

Now, I’m glad that a lot of people want to see Michael Jackson, they should, he’s the best entertainer there has ever been, but what I’m getting a little annoyed about this last week, since his announcement, is all of the ‘fair-weather fans’ that have cropped up; people who say they love Michael, and want to see him, yet have never been to any of his concerts or bought any of his albums.

These are the same people who questioned his guilt during his two trials, and still question his guilt now. Some people are even boasting how they’ll buy tickets and sell them on eBay.

I have to say I’m really pissed off at this, as someone who has seen both the Dangerous and History tours, and even travelled to Prague to see him, the prospect of not getting tickets because of some ‘shallow hal’ person who has a vague curiosity in seeing Michael Jackson makes me livid.

There should be some sort of criteria for getting Michael Jackson tickets, such as having to have attended at least two prior MJ concerts, or owning the Spanish 12” single ‘Todo Mi Amor Eres Tu’.

Michael Jackson’s last ever tour in the UK is for Michael Jackson fans, not the sort of people I’ve heard in the last few days.

Sky News quotes me on why Friends Reunited failed

I was asked by Sky News yesterday morning for my views on why the social networking website Friends Reunited failed, when sites like Facebook and MySpace prospered. The reason for the question was the news yesterday that ITV had to sack 600 people after they announced they’d lost billions of pounds, some of which was on their poorly researched purchase of Friends Reunited in 2005 for £120 million.

What were they thinking?

I told Sky News how Friends Reunited was eclipsed by other, better, social networking sites because Friends Reunited tried to rely on the subscription model to provide access to your friends, whereas better competitors were offering more for free. Friends Reunited failed to act when the likes of Facebook cropped up, insisting their subscription model would work, while their members left in their droves.

Now Friends Reunited is worthless, which is considerably less than the £125 million ITV were duped out of for it.

I do wonder just who makes these decisions, and how they’re able to get £125 million to play with on an obviously bad investment.

I hope someone lost their job over that one.

CeMAP Training

I had wondered what the term CeMAP Training actually meant, but as I’ve just bought a house (which completes on Monday, when I get the keys) I’ve now realised what it means and exactly why it’s so important in the current climate.

The term means the ‘Certificate in Mortgage Advice and Practice’ and is awarded to people who qualify from their CeMAP exam to become mortgage advisers. My own personal mortgage adviser was with Lloyds TSB, and he ensured I had the right mortgage package so that I could afford the house I’m buying in Manchester, so he was very helpful to me, when most people wouldn’t have given me a mortgage right now because of the CSA deductions I’m currently experiencing, despite having already paid off more than their stated arrears.

But that’s for another blog post. This one is about my new house, which I’ll be living in from Monday 9th (which also happens to be my youngest son’s birthday) and I’m able to finally ditch BT, as I’m having Virgin Media installed.

So I’m getting a new house, with REAL broadband and Sky Sports. Things are looking up. Thanks for the help Tim!

BBC Radio 5 Live reporting on the CSA this week

The guys at BBC Radio 5 Live are featuring the Child Support Agency this week, and are looking for people who have experienced horror stories with them. I’ve already had a phone call today from Phillip Kemp asking to be put in touch with people who have expressed their views on MrDaz.com, and I’ve just had an email from ‘Howard’ pointing out this request from the Beeb.

Radio Five live is looking to do a story (on Sunday) about cases where CSA have created large debts on accounts but despite this being their fault, they are threatening enforcement if the debts are not repaid as per their demands.

They are particularly interested in any case where this has happened and the case involves a child that the NRP was unaware of until CSA made contact years later.

This is one of the rare opportunities whereby the press are looking at issues of unfair practices from CSA, so I have taken the liberty of emailing everyone as I know how many of you have been affected by this problem.

I hope many of you will want to make your story known, so please email Phillip Kemp on phillip.kemp@bbc.co.uk.

If you are going to email please be brief. They will not have time to read the full history of your case, so just put two or three sentences to explain how CSA have created the debt, the debt total, plus what if any enforcement action has been threatened/taken. If they want more details, they will contact you.

The program is due to go out on Friday, so will be wanting to speak to people to make recordings in the next day or two.

So if you’ve been troubled by the CSA, maybe they’ve sent your bank details to someone else or whatever the story, tell the BBC now!

Hotmail error

I’ve had the misfortune of using Microsoft’s Hotmail lately (I rarely use it normally) and wondered if it’s normal that Hotmail constantly errors and blames its errors on some crap about updating?

I mean, who do Microsoft think they’re kidding? Every few seconds I’m getting an error when trying to send an email, with the following message appearing:

We’ve updated Windows Live Hotmail, so please refresh your browser or close it and sign in again. If you are composing a message, make sure you save it as a draft.

Yeah right Microsoft, I bet you’re updating Hotmail constantly causing it to error. Is it not more likely that your bug ridden system is so poor that it just can’t function without breaking?

Sort it out Bill!

Dominoes Pizza in Cheadle Hulme refuse to honour stated price

I just tried to order some pizza from Dominoes Pizza in Cheadle Hulme, Manchester, using a voucher that I have that gives me 1 pizza free when I purchase a regular pizza and a starter.

I checked their website, because I didn’t have a menu, and chose the following pizzas:

Medium Mighty Meaty – £11.99
Medium Hot & Spicy £10.99
Potato Wedges £2.99

The cheaper of the pizzas, the Hot and Spicy, was free, making the total £14.98. Yet when the guy turned up with the pizza, he said it was £15.99.

What gives?

He said he couldn’t change the price, so I had to phone them back, which I did. The woman told me that the Mighty Meaty was actually £12.99, not £11.99. Despite my telling her the price on the website, she refused to believe me, so I got the guy stood at the door to read the price from the website to her. She believed him, but didn’t want to do anything about it.

I was then put through to the manager, all the time with the delivery guy stood on my doorstep holding the pizzas. The manager said that they had changed their prices, and the price on the website was nothing to do with him because he was a Franchisee, so was not responsible for the incorrect price. He refused to let me have the pizza for the price that it was advertised for, despite my pointing out that he was in breach of trading standards.

You can see the price on the website here.

dominoes

Incredibly, I had to refuse the pizzas and send them back, where they were no doubt thrown away, all for the sake of £1.01 (not sure where the extra penny came from?).

The manager at Dominoes Pizza in Cheadle Hulme needs to realise that you can’t change the prices of something when it’s advertised somewhere else for a lower price, and not honour the price.